HELPING STUDENTS

NAVIGATE THE
COLLEGE PROCESS

Brighter Horizon’s mission is to support high school students in becoming the first in their family to pursue a four-year college education.

Our Mission

Brighter Horizon’s mission is to support high school students in becoming the first in their family to pursue a four-year college education. With a focus on academic achievement, mentoring, and financial need, the Organization seeks to open opportunities for underserved youth to whom a four-year degree would otherwise be inaccessible.

Our Organization fulfills this mission through a hands-on approach to college preparation, entrance testing, application processes, financial aid, and mentoring, in addition to internship and full-time employment assistance for first-generation students throughout their education.

graduation hat - scrolls

Kelsie
Brighter Horizon Scholar

Meet Kelsie

Being the first in my family to graduate from college will not only change my life, but the lives of others around me. I had to overcome many obstacles, including losing my mother. Thanks for helping me to make a difference in this world.

Did You Know?

 

41%

of African-American students are first generation students, while 61% of Latino students and 25% of white and Asian-American students belong to this demographic.

Research shows significant differences in enrollment, degree attainment and finances for students whose parents have a bachelor’s degree or higher compared to students whose parents have little or no college experience.

 

48%

of first-generation students enrolled in just two-year schools compared to only 32% of students whose parents had at least a bachelor’s degree.

First-generation students demonstrated lower rates of college readiness in key academic areas compared to their non-first-generation peers, putting them at a higher risk of failing out of college.

 

11%

of low-income, first-generation college students will have a college degree within six years of enrolling in school compared to 55% of their peers who were not low-income or first-generation students.

First-generation students are borrowing from the federal government at increasing rates to pay for their education (from 15% in 1997 to approximately 37% in 2013).

 

 

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